Articles By Anisur Rahman

Anisur Rahman (b.1950) is a poet, translator and literary critic. Formerly a Professor of English at Jamia Millia Islamia, a Central University in New Delhi. He is currently Senior Advisor at Rekhta Foundation, the world’s largest website on Urdu language, literature, and culture. He has worked and published in the areas of Comparative, Translation, Urdu, and Postcolonial Studies with special reference to the literatures of South Asia, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. He has to his credit four books authored by him, six edited/co-edited volumes, and two collections of Urdu poetry in English translation. Professor Rahman has also been an academic administrator. He has served as Head, Department of English; Dean, Students Welfare; Director, Centre for Coaching and Career Planning; and Registrar, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi. He has been a Shastri Fellow at the University of Alberta, Canada (2001-2002) and a Visiting Scholar at Purdue University, USA (2007).

love story, meera, meeraji, mad, love, urdu

Ishqnaama: The love-life of Meeraji

A major modernist poet, by all means, Meeraji is also a myth of sorts. He had to be so, for he lived a life completely atypical and totally abysmal.

Hai Munir teri nigaah mein koyi baat gehrey malaal ki

Hai Munir Teri Nigaah Mein Koi Baat Gehre Malaal Ki

Niyazi may be read as a poet of memories and reveries, fictions and fancies who drew upon them as his basic material. He was a poet of soft notes, audible whispers, and intimate expostulations. His disputes and dissents with life and time are firm, his diction is polite, and his tones of voice echo in hearts rather than heads.

Josh Malihabadi

Ishqnaama: The love-life of Josh Malihabadi

An emotionally honest Josh has remained an icon of love with a difference. In this extraordinary narrative Yaadon ki Baraat spread over 729 pages, he has narrated his love-life in 57 pages and unabashedly claimed that he loved “not once but eighteen times”.

cover heer ranjha image bolg photo love story [prem kahani

Qissa-Kahaani Banaam Heer Ranjha

Some stories never die; they are told again and again, from time to time, place to place, author to author. One such is the story of Heer and Ranjha. About six centuries old now, it was first narrated in verse by one DamodarArora during the reign of Emperor Akbar. Damodar was a native of Jhang where the story is broadly based and he had heard it from one Raja Ram Khatri who is supposed to be an eyewitness to all that happened. Since then it has been narrated variously and in various languages, both in verse and prose. One of the most notable narratives came from Waris Shah in 1766, apart from several others in Sindhi, Haryanavi, Hindi, Urdu, Persian, and English. In Persian alone, there are as many as twenty versions of this story and in Urdu not less than fifteen.

rekhtablog urdu poetry blog meer

Qissa Kahaani Banaam More Naama

The stories of human-animal love are not too rare. Here is an atypical story of love between a queen and a peacock told by no less a master craftsman than Meer Taqi Meer (1723-1810). This verse- narrative known as More Naama has survived through two centuries and has been acknowledged as an exemplar of Meer’s skill of telling a tale in a poetical framework which is allegorical in nature and far reaching in appeal

Twitter Feeds

Facebook Feeds