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Gulshan-e-Ishq

Finding love--at last--in the garden of love.

It is almost impossible to say for sure when the story of prince Manohar and princess Madhumalti was told first and by whom. It may be safe to surmise that it is essentially a travelling tale that reached different people through folklorists. Supposedly, Sheikh Manjhan was the first to write this story in Hindi under the title of Madhumalti sometime in the mid-sixteenth century. During different periods of history, this story was written and re-written at least nine times in Persian and thirteen times in Urdu with different titles. The one written by Mohammad Nusrat Nusrati in 1657 is a memorable literary memento from the garden of love, so appropriately titled as Gulshan-e-Ishq.

We have said it all Nothing left to say Let’s go for a drink The night is here to stay

Abhi Raat Kuch Hai Baaqi

When the night finds itself as a muse in Urdu poetry

Poets have often represented night- now as an image, now as a metaphor, now as a symbol. And the way Urdu poets signify different dimensions of the night will definitely leave you spellbound. Here we present a constellation of seven couplets from the mesmerising galaxy of Urdu poetry.

Ai mohabbat tere anjaam pe rona aaya Jaane kyun aaj tere naam pe rona aaya

Shakeel Badayuni: Poet as lyricist; lyricist as poet!

Kal Raat Zindagi Se Mulaaqaat Ho Gayi

A ghazal aficionado, Shakeel Badayuni developed a dialogue with life in all its romantic glory and grandeur

Husn-e-Jaana ki tareef mumkin nahi

Husn-e-Jaana Ki Tareef Mumkin Nahin

Husn-e-baakamaal ki tamseel, sher-o-shayari ke saanche mein.

When it comes to praising the glory of your beloved, poetry always comes handy.

Hai Munir teri nigaah mein koyi baat gehrey malaal ki

Hai Munir Teri Nigaah Mein Koi Baat Gehre Malaal Ki

Munir Niyazi: A poet of soft notes, audible whispers

Niyazi may be read as a poet of memories and reveries, fictions and fancies who drew upon them as his basic material.

Jigar Moradabadi

Jigar Moradabadi: The Quintessential Romantic

Hum ko mitaa sakey yeh zamaane mein dum nahin

When one thinks of the Urdu ghazal that celebrates romantic love and pleasures of wine, one naturally thinks of Jigar Moradabadi. This is but a stereotype that has eclipsed his greater worth.